Odds & Ends
fromawindowseat:

From a Window Seat

Hey. I’m combining my two tumblrs and posting everything on fromawindowseat (formerly photogenicsloth) from now on. Most people who follow me here follow me there anyway but if you don’t and you like what you see here please come on over for more of it, plus pics from the sky and an rv park by the airport.

fromawindowseat:

From a Window Seat

Hey. I’m combining my two tumblrs and posting everything on fromawindowseat (formerly photogenicsloth) from now on. Most people who follow me here follow me there anyway but if you don’t and you like what you see here please come on over for more of it, plus pics from the sky and an rv park by the airport.

All Quiet on the Western Front

All Quiet on the Western Front

First Listen: Bob Dylan, Highlights From ‘Another Self Portrait (1969-1971)’ on NPR

This is a song about wanting to be the fuck off an airplane.

From Wikipedia:


Zelda was the inspiration for “Witchy Woman” the song of seductive enchantresses written by Don Henley and Bernie Leadon for the Eagles, after Henley read Zelda’s biography…

From Wikipedia:

While Scott received acclaim for The Great Gatsby and his short stories, and the couple socialized with literary luminaries like Ernest Hemingway, their marriage was a tangle of jealousy, resentment and acrimony. Scott used their relationship as material in his novels, even lifting snippets from Zelda’s diary and assigning them to his fictional heroines. Seeking an artistic identity of her own, Zelda wrote magazine articles and short stories, and at 27 became obsessed with a career as a ballerina, practicing to exhaustion.

The strain of her tempestuous marriage, Scott’s increasing alcoholism, and her growing instability presaged Zelda’s admittance in 1930 to the Sheppard Pratt sanatorium in Towson, Maryland, where she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. While there, she wrote a semi-autobiographical novel, Save Me the Waltz, which was published in 1932. Scott was furious that she had used material from their life together, though he would go on to do the same, as in Tender Is the Night, published in 1934; the two novels provide contrasting portrayals of the couple’s failing marriage.

From Wikipedia:
By 1930 the Fitzgeralds were again living in Europe. Zelda had her first nervous breakdown in early 1930 and was institutionalized in Switzerland. It soon became apparent that she would never fully recover. Fitzgerald’s father died in 1931, an event that was written into the final novel as Dick’s father’s death. Devastated by these blows (and by his own unrelenting alcoholism), Fitzgerald had settled in suburban Baltimore by 1932, and had finally decided what he was going to write his novel about – a man of almost limitless potential who makes the fatal decision to marry a beautiful but mentally ill woman, and who ultimately sinks into despair and alcoholism when their doomed marriage fails…
Ultimately, he poured everything he had into Tender – his feelings about his own wasted talent and (self-perceived) professional failure and stagnation; his feelings about his parents (who on a symbolic level provided much of the inspiration for Dick and Nicole Diver); about his marriage, and Zelda’s illness, and psychiatry (about which he had learned a great deal during her treatment); about his affair with Lois Moran, and Zelda’s with the French aviator Edouard Jozan (paralleled in the relationship between Nicole Diver and Tommy Barban)…
 The book was received with mixed reviews and sales, much to the consternation of the author. It has since grown in sales and reputation

From Wikipedia:

By 1930 the Fitzgeralds were again living in Europe. Zelda had her first nervous breakdown in early 1930 and was institutionalized in Switzerland. It soon became apparent that she would never fully recover. Fitzgerald’s father died in 1931, an event that was written into the final novel as Dick’s father’s death. Devastated by these blows (and by his own unrelenting alcoholism), Fitzgerald had settled in suburban Baltimore by 1932, and had finally decided what he was going to write his novel about – a man of almost limitless potential who makes the fatal decision to marry a beautiful but mentally ill woman, and who ultimately sinks into despair and alcoholism when their doomed marriage fails…


Ultimately, he poured everything he had into Tender – his feelings about his own wasted talent and (self-perceived) professional failure and stagnation; his feelings about his parents (who on a symbolic level provided much of the inspiration for Dick and Nicole Diver); about his marriage, and Zelda’s illness, and psychiatry (about which he had learned a great deal during her treatment); about his affair with Lois Moran, and Zelda’s with the French aviator Edouard Jozan (paralleled in the relationship between Nicole Diver and Tommy Barban)…

The book was received with mixed reviews and sales, much to the consternation of the author. It has since grown in sales and reputation

look at this little shit

look at this little shit

dawesomeness:

Dawes - From The Right Angle - How To Play (by Dawes)

What a dude

perfect

perfect

Happy to watch Colonel Chris Hadfield make it home safely, and I hope he will keep up his tweets and tumbls from here on earth.

Happy to watch Colonel Chris Hadfield make it home safely, and I hope he will keep up his tweets and tumbls from here on earth.